THE GHOST OF THEO'S WRECK

A 'Peter Pan' of so many talents

A tibutute to Nigel Froome of Guernsey / The Original Ghost of Theo's Wreck / With kind permission of The Guernsey Press Office By Bill Exley

The death of Nigel Froome while snorkelling on the coral reefs off Grand Bahama on 24 June 1989 was in so many ways a fitting, albeit tragic, end to a life filled with an abiding interest in the underwater world. Nigel was brought to Guersey as a young child in the 1930's and was schooled at Les Vauxbelets in Guernsey and Victoria College in Jersey.

The Occupation of the islands had a dramatic impact on his life as he was interned in Germany, having being seperated from his parents. He returned to Guernsey as a young man and worked with Johnnie Ray around the Channel Islands waters. Their interest in salvage work and fishing encouraged them to devote much of their energy, as well as ingenuity, to the design, manufacturing and testing of underwater equipment, especially breathing apparatus.Nigel was wholly at ease in the water, He was a hero to the young men who enjoyed spearfishing and then became enthralled by scuba diving in the 1950's at a time when the exploration of the undersea world was hazardous but exhilarating. For many their professional lives have centred on sub-sea activities around the world as well as in these islands. He amazed a wider audience at the Vallette swimming galas both with his escapes from a straight jacket inside a box locked and chained and thrown into the pool and as one of the highboard Crazy Gang.

In 1958 Nigel left Guernsey for the Mediterranean then the Bahamas where he ran a sports diving business until his retirement in 1983. His diving interests took him to many exotic locations where he used his outstanding talent as a photographer of the natural world. He won a number of awards in the annual international competion run by Spectrum. His favourite retreat was Port Antonio, Jamaica, where he spent happy weeks each year. Nigel Froome leaves many friends spread over each continent who will remember with very great admiration and affection the best diver they ever met, the talented photographer, an irreligious man who was irreverent to the point of hilarity, a wickedly witty letter writer and raconteur who loved roast dinners and gooey deserts (a la Mrs Mckenna) and huge plates of fish and chips (a la Frank's). Wagner played at full blast a perfect end to his day. For those of us lucky enough to know Nigel, he was never old. Memories from Geoff Baker

 

AN IN DEPTH LOOK AT THE GHOST OF THEO'S WRECK

Friend and colleague Lou Lihou who operates out of the diving school at Grand Bahama Hotel says that the coroner thinks Mr Froome had a 'shallow water blackout', when the brain becomes starved of oxygen. He used to play a trick on tourist divers on Theo's Wrcck (an old cement ship deliberately sank to provide a diving venue), says Mr Lihou. He used to swim half a mile out to the wreck which was in 150ft of water then dive just using his snorkel, mask, weight belt and flippers, down to the bridge, which was 80ft down. He would wave back to the tourists as they arrivd above him in their Glass bottomed boat. They could not belive their eyes, says Mr Lihou (a very close freind of Nigel who had previously joined him from Guernsey)

He was soon given the title The Ghost of Theo's Wreck. He left the shore as usual last Saturday, carrying a sandwich wrapped in a polythene bag with a 'joke-note' in it for the tourist diving instructor. The next time he was seen was by people in a glass bottomed boat. He was dead and about 50ft under water with his hands clasped behind his back ( in his normal swimming position) his snorkel,mask, flippers and weight belt all on. Mr Lihou says that the evidence from this and Nigel's diving doctor indicates that he had a shallow water blackout and that there is unlikely to be an inquest. 'One good thing is that he didn't want to make arthritic old bones- he went the way he would have wanted,' says a sad Mr Lihou. It is likely he wil be buried at sea (At this juncture I postulate that this is where the phrase The Ghost of Theo's wreck was born) B.Ex.

MY OWN MEMORIES of NIGEL FROOME an old Friend I knew.

To finalise these Tributes, I knew Nigel and John (Lou) Lihou from my life in Guernsey during the mid 1950's, the Halcyon days of our teenage years. I saw Nigel swim using a synchronous style which, if there were a Mens' Synchronised swimming event, he would be first as a selection. His steady leg kick, plus relaxed Crawl stroke took him easily across to Herm Island, the annual swim of 3 to 4 miles, with many saying he could have done the return swim back. To reiterate the words before me, he was a member of the 'High Board Crazy Gang' my memory was of him, on the top diving board, sat on a wooden kitchen chair reading a newspaper, with his back to the pool, with an enthralled audience at La Vallette pools looking on. He would slowly rock back and forth, maintaining perfect balance by leg movements. After 4 or 6 times he would enter the deep water, and the event judge would announce ''Nigel can stay underwater for 3 or 4 minutes, or more''. What the onlookers did not know, was that Nigel could easily swim a length of the pool under water (we all could), go slowly up the wall at the far end of the pool and enter a Preset Box of a foot square and into fresh air. He would be gazing out of a 'slot' to Herm Island for 6 to 8 mins, then return the same way to emege under the divimg boards.

He made a very good Harpoon Gun, which was crafted from one piece of Mahogany about 2 feet long, this was shaped and Button -Polished. The harpoon gun was then finished with a 'jewel chromed' retaining tube for the harpoon and a hand grip which was inlaid with pieces of white formica. This item won him a Prestigious prize from the U.K. The trigger mechanism and brass hinged barb he designed and produced himself.

He then went on to make a very high quality Valve Amplifier powered by KT66 Valves, all this from his 'self taught' electronics. Modern valve amplifiers are built these days to order, at high prices, by Marshall Amps of Cambridge and soid to the top groups. I heard Ride of the Valkyries and 'Toccata and Fuge' for Organ by Bach, a true experience.

Lou, Bill Hill, David Kreckeler a local author and acclaimed athlete and I, were all members of the 1st. Guernsey Sea Scouts. My last memory of Nigel Froome was being with him at La Vallette pool one day. He was holding up a huge Conger eel he had just caught off the nearby rocks -his jointed Aluminium hand Harpoon was bent like a letter 'S' , by the eel's fight for survival. Eels are a ferocious and strong oponent to take on- with huge jaw and two rows of inverted teeth, But here was Nigel- prize in hand-with a comical grin as usual on his face. . Bill Exley